Friends of the Mountain Dulcimer

Appalachian mountain dulcimer players- make friends, share, learn to play- Free!

What is a "church" dulcimer, and what makes it different from a "regular" mountain dulcimer?

Views: 195

Replies to This Discussion

A Church dulcimer was usually six stringed, and with a much wider and deeper body with largish sound holes.  The idea was that it produced enough volume to be used for hymn accompaniment in the tiny hills churches...
Thanks, Ken!
Anyone have a photo of one , or know of one?

Thanks, Ken!

 

Until you answered, I was thinking it might be similar to a "church autoharp", which is set up to favor the "flat" keys found in most church hymnals rather than the "sharp" keys found in most old-time music.  However, any dulcimer can be re-tuned and/or capo'd in such a way as to play the flat keys.

Virginia - they look exactly like any other dulcimer, but have a deeper (and sometimes wider) profile.  Most of the ones I've seen are Ellipsoidal or Teardrop shaped.  Look at the avatar for the Galax Dulcimer Group here.

The one I had (a Hughes) was that Ellipsoidal shape, about 8" wide and 3" deep with a 28" VSL.  Hughes Dulcimer company was a great promoter of the Church dulcimer back in the late 60s and 70s.  Here's a link to some photos of the Hughes Church dulcimer:

 

http://tinyurl.com/ChurchDulcimer

I thought that you were going to say "to favor flat singers" in church.

Jim Edwards said:

Thanks, Ken!

 

Until you answered, I was thinking it might be similar to a "church autoharp", which is set up to favor the "flat" keys found in most church hymnals rather than the "sharp" keys found in most old-time music.  However, any dulcimer can be re-tuned and/or capo'd in such a way as to play the flat keys.

Thanks, Ken, for posting that link--the photos helped a lot!

Ken Hulme said:

Virginia - they look exactly like any other dulcimer, but have a deeper (and sometimes wider) profile.  Most of the ones I've seen are Ellipsoidal or Teardrop shaped.  Look at the avatar for the Galax Dulcimer Group here.

The one I had (a Hughes) was that Ellipsoidal shape, about 8" wide and 3" deep with a 28" VSL.  Hughes Dulcimer company was a great promoter of the Church dulcimer back in the late 60s and 70s.  Here's a link to some photos of the Hughes Church dulcimer:

 

http://tinyurl.com/ChurchDulcimer

RSS

SINGLE INSTRUCTOR WORKSHOPS, Performances, Band Gigs & Special Club Event NOTICES

Offering some special workshops? Performing at a gig? A Dulcimer Club activity? List your SINGLE INSTRUCTOR Special Event or workshop- CLICK HERE!

The Inspired Volunteer FOTMD Welcoming Commitee of the month!

3 CHEERS to members

Jim Fawcett


Karen Keane

 

John Wood

 

R N Lacky

 

Louis Stivali

 

Kenneth Longfield

 

Benjamin Barr

John Keane
...For warmly greeting new members and making them feel welcome here on FOTMD!

 =============

Visit Strumelia's Beginner Noter-Drone dulcimer Blog

I have a main blog for Traditional style mountain dulcimer playing here: Mountain Dulcimer Noter-drone Blog This is an old style of playing where you only fret your notes on the melody string, while letting the drones strings ring open. In my blog, I express my personal views about playing, I offer free TAB and free beginner videos, and I try to help beginners understand in a very basic simple way the 'mysteries' of playing the mountain dulcimer in traditional modal noter/drone style.

© 2014   Created by Strumelia.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service