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Does anyone know if there is a "B" part to Aunt Rhody. I am doing a calypso version of the song and would like to add a second section.

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Okay Wayne, I'm a little dense and need a map. Where would one find this audio clip?

There is no traditional B part to Aunt Rhody, but it is possible someone has written something to use as one. Why not just sing it as is?

Paul

I had never heard of a B part to Rhody either.  I would guess that what Wayne is playing as a B part is actually a harmony part. It sounds like the two parts he plays would sound great played simultaneously.

The B part is on Jean Ritchie's "The Most Dulcimer" album, "Aunt Rhodie R I P."

Harmony or Part B, Really sounds like a nice addition. 

Dusty Turtle said:

I had never heard of a B part to Rhody either.  I would guess that what Wayne is playing as a B part is actually a harmony part. It sounds like the two parts he plays would sound great played simultaneously.

No need to apologize, Wayne. Dulcimer Jim was looking for new ideas to add to his version of Go Tell Aunt Rhody, and you certainly gave him that.

 

Have you tried to play the two parts together?  Try playing the second part over your recording of the first part. I bet they would sound really good.
 
Wayne Anderson said:

Sorry guys, I was just trying to help out on a question that was asked


I'm not singing it, I'm playing it in a different style and it gets boring playing the same notes over and over. Even on different parts of the fretboard. I found a "B" part for Boil them Cabbage and I thought there might be a second part to Aunt Rhody.
Paul Certo said:

There is no traditional B part to Aunt Rhody, but it is possible someone has written something to use as one. Why not just sing it as is?

Paul

Thanks for all the replies. Being new to the dulcimer I am not sure of the proper name and with your help "harmony part" would be a good word. The second part I found for "Boil them Cabbage" is like a harmony part. During a class, with Dave Haas, he handed out "B T C" with a "B" part. So, that is why I was asking about Aunt Rhody.

Thanks, it makes for a nice ending.
Wayne Anderson said:

Hello Dulcimer Jim - just put an audio only clip of what I have as the A and B part of Aunt Rhody - hope this helps.

Hey Dulcimer Jim,

 

Technically a "B" part refers to a second part of a song, meaning a different melody and different chord progression. Most fiddle tunes, for example, have an A part and a B part. In general you play the A part twice and then the B part twice.  In songs with words, often the B part is just a chorus that is repeated after each verse.

 

What you seem to be looking for would be better termed "variations." That is, you are searching for variations on a tune so that you can play several verses without repeating yourself. In that sense, whether Wayne's B part is a harmony part or not is less important than the fact that it differs (or varies) from the standard melody and allows you to play another variation on the melody.

 

What I would urge you do to is not necessarily memorize a variation that someone else has played, but get ideas from those variations and see if you can come up with something on your own. One reason we use Bile Dem Cabbage as an introductory song is that so many variations are possible and the song can be a catalyst for igniting the imagination of each individual player. Even your initial premise of doing a calypso version of Rhody is an example of creating a rhythmic variation of a tune, so you are well on your way to creating interesting music of your own!

The melody of Go Tell Aunt Rhodie is from an old hymn. I've got a recording of an old 78 (maybe from the 30's) of a guy playing and singing Go Tell Aunt Rhodie to the exact melody of the hymn (I can't think of the name right now) and the form is AABA. Here's a quarter-note version. (You add the extra strums.) I use this B almost every time I play it. Make sure every time through you play AABA, AABA, etc. Could someone help us find the hymn?

1st A:

2 - 2 1 | 0 - 0 - | 1 - 1 3 | 2 1 0 -

4 - 4 3 | 2 - 2 - | 1 0 1 2 | 0 - 0 -

2nd A:

2 - 2 1 | 0 - 0 - | 1 - 1 3 | 2 1 0 -

4 - 4 3 | 2 - 2 - | 1 0 1 2 | 0 - 0 -

B:

2 - 2 3 | 4 - 4 - | 5 - 5 - | 4 3 2 - 

2 - 2 3 | 4 - 4 - | 5 - 5 - | 4 - - -

3rd A:

2 - 2 1 | 0 - 0 - | 1 - 1 3 | 2 1 0 -

4 - 4 3 | 2 - 2 - | 1 0 1 2 | 0 - 0 -

From a harmonic perspective, that looks like a legit B part since it goes to the IV chord (fret 5) in the same measures where the A part goes to the V chord (first fret).

The hymn is "Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing."

 

But it is also credited to Schubert as "Rousseau's Dream," and this version provides some nice ideas for variations (although it also goes off into places only Oscar Peterson would understand).

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